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    Marketing Topics


  1. The Three Big Holes in the Buyer’s Journey Development

    There are three big holes in the common development of a B-to-B buyer’s journey - and chances are that your buyer’s journey profile (or 'persona') has all of them. The three big holes are:

  2. How to Develop Successful LEED® Marketing

    LEED marketing is taking on all the characteristics of technology marketing. If you understand and use successful technology marketing practices for your LEED marketing, you can skip the traditional trial-and-error process of an evolving and crowded LEED market and leapfrog to marketing success.

  3. Professional Networking - Effective professional networking is more of: "I have this to offer" rather than "I want"

    The term networking is one of the most overused - and misunderstood - in today's professional environment. Too often it is job seekers or others who only network when they want something - like a job. What many of these amateurs overlook is that professional information and favors are much like a bank account - you can't make withdrawals unless you've made deposits. Here are some pragmatic tips for professioanl networking.

  4. Business Development, Market Sizing and Territory Planning

    Although sales forecasting is an art and science unto itself - market forecasting (in other words - the total size of the market, given some reasonable assumptions) is not rocket science, and once you understand how to do market sizing, it is relatively straightforward. Here are some tips for determining market opportunity and conducting sales feasibility analyses.

  5. How to Develop a Deep Case Study
    The customer profile or application case study (sometimes referred to as a ‘success story', or mis-labeled as a ‘customer testimonial') is one of the most powerful tools in the public relations or sales and marketing toolbox. However, not all case studies are the same. There are case studies - and there are Deep Case Studies. The Deep Case Study goes much further into the how and the why of the customer's experience. Traditional case studies focus primarily on the "what" - as in a historical account of what happened. When properly prepared, a deep case study gives a 360-degree view (vendor and customer) of how your products or services solve business problems for your customers, and why customers chose you as their vendor. Chances are, your CEO couldn't do a better job making the case in person. But most case studies don't come anywhere near meeting this criteria and are, in fact, a boring read. Some are actually so bad as to be a liability from a sales and marketing perspective. Here's some tips and a checklist for developing deep case studies to help make your customer profiles as interesting to your prospects and other third parties (such as the media and industry analysts) as they are to the very customers you are profiling.

  6. Do-It-Yourself Consulting - Some Caveats

    The Wall Street Journal recently ran a front-page article on this topic. Here's the part they left out. Using your executive peers for do-it-yourself consulting can have more downsides than you expect. Here are some factors to think about, and tips on what to look for in an advisor.

  7. Painful Marketing Forums

    In periodically cruising the online forums that address marketing topics, I've noticed that over the last few years that reading the postings has become more and more painful. It's hard to tell who is more clueless - the posters or the respondents - many of whom are self-styled experts mixing opinion and cliches to offer a range of home remedies for the perceived marketing ills of the posters. So how do you evaluate the value of the exchanges between poster and respondent, and evaluate the advice and commentary that you read on the online marketing forums? Here are some tips:

  8. Are You Sure You are "On-message"?

    A major concern for marketing and sales executives is that they are always 'on-message' with all of the communications that reach their prospects and customers - helping to create, establish and build a customer relationship that will ‘competition-proof' their customers. Here's a diagnostic process that will keep you 'on message'.

  9. The Voice of the Market Survey - How to get Answers from Your Market

    Voice of the Market are qualitative surveys that can give marketing executives a unique 18-month look-ahead to help them ‘get their hands around' their markets. When focused on specific marketing problems and completed in a timely fashion, they serve to reduce uncertainty with marketing decisions and heighten the probability of marketing success. Here's how to develop a Voice of the Market survey.

  10. CSI Marketing - Separating Fact from Fiction

    With the arrival of blogs and other forms of unstructured commentary on business topics, the issue for business owners and executives becomes how to separate meaningful commentary from much of what is simply opinion, with no value beyond that of the narrator's anecdotal experience. Much like the investigators on the popular series CSI, the challenge is to separate fact from fiction, or reality from superficial perceptions. Information forensics may be the latest technique necessary to separate mere appearances from the facts.

  11. Can Your Marketing Pass the Test?

    With the billions that is spent on marketing each year, in a country where sales and marketing has been raised to almost an art form, why is it that most marketing really doesn't work? By saying it doesn't work, we mean the number of new product failures and unmet revenue goals. A quick check of the marketing visualization and marketing process that follows it can point to the problems.

  12. How's Your Return on Messaging (ROM)?

    Marketing ROI often chases the wrong issues - the real issue is how well your messaging reaches the desired audience, and if they understand and act on it. Conventional ROI techniques often can't measure these factors. Here's some tips on what to look for.

  13. Law Firm Marketing: A Practical Approach

    Successful attorneys have a keen understanding the marketing principles that pertain to legal services, and how to develop a marketing program and style that is unique to their firm and to them as an individual. This can be accomplished while still maintaining the special professional aura that is attributed to those who practice law. How to develop and implement such a program for a law practice is the focus of this article.

  14. Tactical Marketing for a Tough Economy

    Handspring (maker of the Treo line of wireless handhelds) recently laid off most of its marketing department - including the VP. Was that indicative of a new trend, or more the fact that their marketing function failed to justify its existence? In a depressed economy, does it make sense to abandon the marketing ship, or does it simply need a new course? Here's a few benchmarks to help you connect your marketing more closely to the revenue dollars.

  15. Marketing ROI - Estimating Your ‘Reachable' Market Potential

    Developing a realistic marketing ROI starts with the accurate determination of your reachable market, segmenting that market by characteristics, and then determining the competitive environment in each segment. A realistic look at these factors can highlight profit-poor markets that are masked by apparently large prospect numbers. This is an added benefit - a hard look at the market segments helps you to select the areas of the market that will give you the highest potential for profitable sales, and hence a good ROI - before you even budget a single marketing dollar.

  16. Avoiding Product Marketing Errors: Six Tips for Using Product Review Public Relations

    Product reviews help decision makers (users or buyers) evaluate competitive products and narrow their selection process. Product reviews serve as part of the sales messaging effort. Properly leveraged, they can help to shorten the sales cycle and speed up the customer evaluation period. There is a lot that the vendor can do to help the product review process along, and to try to get their product reviewed in the most favorable light. Much of this is simply understanding the review process, and developing the structure and materials that will help the reviewer see your product as both you and your top customers do.

  17. Marketing PR versus Journalism PR: You Can't Sell with Journalism

    If you want your PR program to support your sales and marketing - you have to develop a marketing PR program - and avoid using the more common journalism PR. This article shows you how to distinguish between the two, and describes how to develop a marketing PR program to support your sales.

  18. Buzz Marketing? Forget the Buzz - Show You Are a ‘Survivor'

    High-tech PR during the go-go Internet runup used to be built around the concept of ‘buzz' - loosely defined as industry chatter. Although never a really valid metric for communicating your company's competitive distinction, it had a certain allure and appeal - especially if there was no real measurement of the results, and the programs were built around puff pieces on the company's executives and technology ‘superstars'. The media complied with publishing reams of this pablum, and endless lists of ‘Companies to Watch'. Those days are gone - now you want to be perceived as a 'survivor'. Here's some tips on how to persuade your markets not to push you off the island.

  19. High-Tech Branding: Mythology in Search of a Budget
    Hayes gave up. Dell sued their agency. Goldmine, a long-time player and instantly recognizable in the CRM arena, is now Front Range Systems. A growing body of evidence suggests that if you want to build a brand, you had better be able to do it in a single sales cycle.

  20. How to Bridge the Chasm, Not Just Cross It
    The 'chasm' between your expert buyers and mainstream buyers needs to be bridged, not just crossed. Here's how to do it.

  21. Developing A Thematic Release [sm] Program for Channel Marketing

    The Thematic Release Program is a short public relations program that has been specifically focused for a particular market or marketing channel: it is a tight sales and marketing communications program which takes a specific theme (of your choosing) and expands on it to serve as a catalyst for the media to develop it into editorial coverage - with enough flexibility for them to take that theme in a unique direction for that publication. It also serves, in its raw form, as channel marketing and sales collateral - quick, focused and effective. Here's how to develop a Thematic Release program.

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    Sales Topics


  22. The Sales Autopsy SM
    What is the key sales and marketing messaging you can extract from a successful sale - that will attract more sales prospects? Find out with the Sales AutopsySM - a step-by-step diagnostic technique to isolate the success factors hidden in your successful sales.

  23. Can an 'Expert Buyer' Control the Sales Conversation?
    Maybe - Maybe Not

    If your products and marketplace have on-going changes due to technology and other issues - there’s no reason that the professional salesforce, which is the tip of the spear, can’t maintain an informational advantage and re-engineer the buyer’s vison. Admittedly, not as easy as it once was.
    But neither is it impossible.

  24. How to Build a Sales Public Relations Program

    Reaching qualified prospects with your unique competitive message has never been more important - or more difficult. Here's a proven sales tool that most sales professionals overlook.

  25. Opportunity Lost -The economy for new sales is tough. It's a lot tougher if you're invisible

    On-going downsizing and staff reductions have affected just about every business, and a frequent casualty is any corporate function that communicates to the outside world. Short-sighted management has often deemed these functions 'dispensable' - effectively removing their eyes and ears in the marketplace. Opportunities are lost because management just can't see them.

  26. Turning Web Prospects into Customer Profits: How to Use Sales Instruction Techniques

    The ability of most companies to answer even the most basic sales questions is dismal. (How is your product different? How will I use it?) We are not talking esoteric issues here - but rather the basic blocking and tackling of up-front sales information. The reason for this is that most companies are introspective when it comes to their prospects' information needs. They 'preach' to their prospects more than they engage them - never determining what information they need to make the buying decision. Hence, they make the buying process even more difficult for the customer. There's a simple methodology available to prevent this, and it is based in the proven abilities of top salespeople - providing instruction to the prospect on how to make the buying decision

  27. Using Public Relations to Leverage the Hidden Code in Your Successful Sales
    Every successful sale that you make contains a hidden marketing code for reaching your best prospects. If you can break the code and leverage it with your public relations program, you will have a real-time marketing message that will always be on top of the market - and your competitors. Here's how to do it.
  28. Complex Technology Requires an Intelligent, Sales-Based Public Relations Program  
    Public relations for complex technology works best when it is integrated with your sales and marketing strategies. Easier said than done - here's some issues to be aware of, and the capabilities that you will need in your public relations advisors.
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    Public Relations Topics


  29. The Sick Press Release

    When a marketing VP says that he has to rewite his press releases - that tells you something's wrong. It's usually more than just the wordsmithing. Here's a checklist for making sure you will really get what you want in your marketing materials, before you enter into a contract - by knowing how to spot the talent to product it.

  30. Think Twice About that Press Release - You May Have Entered The Google Zone

    Consider the following scenario: Your company, after some tough years (pretty typical for your industry) finally has a new CEO in place for the last year, has shaped up the product offerings and won some impressive second-tier accounts. Now you've been selected as a finalist for that marquee customer Fortune 500 proposal. Your CEO personally heads up the presentation team, and delivers a ‘knock-em-dead' ROI justification for the multi-million, multi-year contract, and personally guarantees to oversee the implementation. As the presentation wraps up, you are daydreaming about the bonus - and then the bomb drops.

  31. ‘60-Second' Elevator PR

    In an over-communicated world, highly focused and brief messages that target your prospects' known hot buttons do a far better job of attracting your sales prospects and other interested parties. That's what is meant by the term ‘60-second elevator speech.' Here's some tips on how to develop a PR effort with that same singular focus.

  32. PR Myths and Urban Legends

    Perhaps because public relations is an unregulated and unlicensed profession, it is the subject of many "myths" and anecdotal "facts" about what is necessary for successful public relations. For any professional who has a grounding in the body of knowledge that makes up the practice of public relations these myths are amusing at times. But in the end - they can cause serious problems to the unsuspecting clients who take them at face value and attempt to build a program on PR "myths and urban legends". Here's a rundown of some of the top PR "myths".

  33. Can Your PR Program Crossover to the Mainstream Business Media?

    In the music business, there is a category known as ‘crossover' - this is a category of hit music that ‘crosses over' from a specific genre to becoming a mainstream hit - examples are reggae (Bob Marley), smooth jazz (Sade) and Cajun (Beausoleil). In a similar sense - if you want to get the most value from your public relations effort - it pays to look for a ‘crossover' appeal to the mainstream business media. Just as crossover music has a distinctive rhythm and beat, your crossover PR has to have distinctive customer experiences and business solutions. Here's what to look for, and how to ‘cross over'.

  34. Losing the Battle for Mindshare: A Guide to Ineffective PR

    One of the biggest benefits of public relations is in the battle for mindshare (media visibility and market understanding) in the marketplace. Rather interestingly, many companies that think they have satisfactory public relations programs in place are losing this battle - for a number of reasons that may surprise you (and them.)

  35. Your Media Miranda Warning: Law & Order-Style Public Relations

    Anything you say can and will be used against you in the court of public opinion...

    My favorite part of the television series Law & Order is the detectives' strategy sessions and interrogations. They have no problem bending the truth and misleading people, then taking the information to build a case. That's what can happen in a media interview if you're not prepared. If you want to be more like the cool defense lawyers rather than the unwitting suspect - here's your media Miranda warning.

  36. Crisis Communications: Some Tips for When It Is Your Turn at Bat

    "Bad news on the doorstep" was the refrain from the popular song years ago. And it seems to be getting a lot of play in the business world these days. With situations ranging from sudden stock gyrations and layoffs, to labor disputes, key executive deaths or disabilities, fires or natural disasters and workplace violence, there is no limit to the type of situations a business executive may be confronted with in any given day. Here are some practical perspectives that management should keep in mind when developing a crisis communications effort.

  37. PR Budgeting for the Coming Economic Downturn

    All the signals point to an economic downturn in 2001. When this happens, PR budgets will come under increasing scrutiny, as will most business expenses. PR agency fees, long accepted both as exorbitant and tolerated as a cost of doing business (in many cases funded by free-flowing VC dollars) will be a prime candidate for budget cutting as the focus turns to increasing profitability. But obtaining better value for your PR budget dollar requires a change in the PR resource selection and management procedures as well. Here's how to make sure your PR program directly supports your bottom line - and not just that of the PR agency.

  38. Looking for Mr. GoodInk - How to find the PR Advisor that is Right for Your Company
    Public relations is one of the most frequently outsourced professional services, but there remains a substantial degree of dissatisfaction with the results of most pr programs. There are many reasons for this, but here are some suggestions for identifying and selecting a pr advisor (consultant or agency) who is right for your company and what you want to accomplish.

  39. The Decline and Fall of Smokestack Journalism
    The Internet has affected a lot of businesses, perhaps none as much as journalism. Once regarded as the high priests of information and informed opinion, journalists now have to demonstrate a definite ‘value add' in order to attract and retain readers' eyeballs. And a lot of them are simply not up to the task. Here are the tell-tale signs of smokestack journalism, and dying publications.

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    Technology Public Relations Topics


  40. Crossing the Technology PR Chasm
    Your market can subtly change from innovators to mainstream buyerw, and your messaging ought to change with it. Here's some tell-tales that your market has changed, and some tips on how to realign your public relations to reach the new buyers.

  41. High-Tech Press Releases "For the Rest of Us"
    Reaching out to your pre-sales audiences with a public relations program is a not a straightforward as it would appear. There are two special considerations that a technology company should keep in mind as it develops and executes its pr program - those are keeping the bandwidth wide and putting it all in hard copy.

  42. The Larry King Approach to High-Tech PR
    Larry King is perhaps the most popular talk show host of all time. So what does his approach have to do with high-tech public relations? Read this article and you'll see why some high-tech pr programs get your attention - for all the right reasons.<

  43. Caveat Expectation: Public Relations Strategies for Emerging Growth Companies  
    Setting market expectations is a key byproduct of the public relations effort. Here are some factors to consider, and some methodologies.
  44. Why PR is Such a Disappointment for High Tech Executives
    Public relations often disappoints the high-tech executive. Here's what to look for in a high-tech public relations program, and from the practitioners bidding on it.

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    Video Topics


  45. Video Tips: Avoid the Train Wrecks Be an Informed Customer

    I recently read a blog post that described four disastrous, train-wreck scenarios in video production and streaming. Not surprisingly, the blog post was by a company claiming expertise in these areas, claiming that such problems would not happen with an experienced vendor.
    I had a different interpretation of the incidents. In essence, the fundamental issue with each of them was a lack of understanding of video production and related issues by the customer. In other words, these customers were uninformed. Again, not surprisingly, they got burnt one way or the other.

  46. Business Video: How to Avoid Being a YouTubeTM Amateur

    With the high degree of success of the YouTubeTM video site, new emphasis has been placed on the role of video for messaging (in addition to entertainment), and no doubt many business executives are taking a new look at video as a way to get their sales and marketing messages out to the markets. But before you rush out to put some "YouTube video" on your web site, it's a good idea to make sure you understand what's involved in producing a business video so you don't wind up looking like a YouTube amateur, unless, of course - that's your market.

  47. Broadcast PR: Working with Community Access TelevisionPRSA Tactics Magazine

    Public relations professionals who are involved in broadcast public relations often overlook community access television as a vehicle for their clients' messages. Although community access television does not have the centralization or unified reach of broadcast and cable television, it can still be an effective channel for community-oriented messages and causes. However, public relations professionals need to be aware of how community access television works, and the differences in dealing with community access as opposed to conventional broadcast or cable television. (This article appeared in the December 2003 issue of PRSA Tactics, page 18)
    ."...that's a great idea about CAT. Your primer is excellent."
    VP Communications, Aircraft Owner's and Pilot's Association [AOPA] - largest pilot's organization in the world

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    Internet + Web


  48. Blogs - Where's the Beef?

    With all the recent frenzy over blogs, one would think that the Internet equivalent of the Gutenberg press with movable type had just arrived. Upon closer scrutiny, it's more the case of some good old dot com hype, with a little breathless high-tech type tabloid reporting thrown in for good measure. Here's a contrarian opinion to the over-enthusiasm on blogs, and a few caveats for both bloggers and counter-bloggers alike.

  49. It's Your Website, Stupid!

    During the presidential campaign of 1992, signs began appearing at campaign stops which read: "It's the economy, stupid!" as a way to remind the candidates of the primary issue that was on the voters' minds. Since then, the expression has entered the common vocabulary. If your prospects and customers could hold up signs for you - they would probably read: "It's your website, stupid!" - giving you a message as to what is (or should be) your number one marketing tool. Are you listening?

  50. Internet Damage Control: How to Prevent and Defend Against a Web Mugging

    Web muggings can take several different forms - they can be reputation muggings - focused at your products, technology or strategy, or they can be morality muggings, which are focused at your management and your treatment of employees (e.g. HR policies and layoffs.) In the extreme, they can be fantasy muggings - where bizarre hoaxes, myths and urban legends can start. There are several preventative measures that can be taken against web muggings, and certain self-defensive methods to ‘fight back' if you're mugged. However, there are also situations when about all you can do is cut your losses. We'll start with the basics, and look at each type of mugging in turn.

  51. How Digital Tools and Audiences are Changing Public Relations for Technology Businesses
    Simply overlaying digital tools on top of a conventional public relations program really doesn't gain you much - the unique characteristics of a 7x24 world requires a rethinking and new structure for your underlying public relations program. Here's what makes the difference...

  52. The 5W's for Direct-to-Web Public Relations
    Public relations materials that are going to be used on the web need to be developed with the business browser in mind. Since most material is only a mouse click from oblivion, a tight, market-centered and user-centered focus is critical for success. Here's the 5W's for your web-based public relations materials.(Note: This article was featured in Web Promote Weekly.)
  53. What Your Web Site Says About Your PR Savvy
    The Internet can be a very powerful tool for your public relations program, but a lot of that depends on how effectively you use the web. Many companies don't get the full potential of the web for their public relations program. This is not due to any unique technical knowledge or webmaster tricks, but rather ignoring basic web characteristics and user orientation. Here are the web site 'Press Room' categories of the Stealth, Egyptian, Smithsonian, Release-of-the-Week Club and the Professional.

  54. PR in Internet Time
    'Internet time' often refers to the increasingly rapid time compression for Internet product development, roll out and the related window of opportunity to gain market share. However, an Internet company's public relations program has to keep pace with the same Internet time schedule. The Internet press release is a tight, self-contained document that takes a specific theme and uses it as a catalyst for the media to develop the release into an article - with enough flexibility for them to take the theme in a unique direction for that publication. Here's how to develop a Internet release program.

  55. Dot.Com Public Relations  
    A colleague recently attended one of the ‘boot camps' for start ups and reported an interesting comment from one of the venture capitalists: they get about 10,000 business plans a year, and maybe fund a dozen or two. That translates to odds of 1,000:1 The chances of an entrepreneur getting any visibility on that radar is pretty slim, unless they already have some industry visibility. A few entrepreneurs have figured this out, and that's why the savvy ones fund their public relations program before they even get venture capital. If you don't like 1,000:1 odds, and you're in the same goldrush with the other technology entrepreneurs, then you might want to increase the odds in your favor with some dot.com pr.

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    Recruiting Communications


  56. The Hidden Messaging in Your Recruitment Advertising

    You communicate a lot more than you realize in recruitment advertising. Here are some guidelines for sending the right message and avoiding self-defeating errors.

  57. Soul of a New Employer: Developing a Public Relations Program to Attract and Retain IT Staff
    It's tough in the current full-employment economy to find competent IT staff, and even tougher to keep them. It's going to get worse over the next decade with the declining availability of a technically trained workforce. Your employee public relations program might make the difference between the ability to attract talent — or the need to scramble for it. Here's how to put your public relations program to work recruiting and retaining your IT talent.

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    Aviation + Flight Instruction


  58. How to find good instruction (and good instructors)

    Few articles provide guidance to potential students in identifying good instructors so that their learning experience is rewarding, challenging and enjoyable. Some instructional experiences, by definition, are not and never will be (the military comes to mind.) But for most of the instructional experiences you will experience you'll usually choose the instructor. Here's some practical tips for finding the best instruction.

  59. Kennedy Crash Shows Public Relations Lessons Learned from TWA Flight 800
    As a public relations professional, Boston-area general aviation pilot and flight instructor, I followed the media reporting on the crash of John F. Kennedy, Jr.'s plane with a fair amount of interest. What I saw during the weekend of July 17-18 showed that valuable lessons had been learned by governmental agencies since the public relations debacle of TWA Flight 800 three years ago.
  60. High-Tech Entrepreneur = Pilot
    Forget the Rolex, the Lamborghini, the 100,000 square-foot 'trophy house'. Want to show everyone you've arrived? Get a pilot's license.

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Respective logos and trademarks copyrighted by their publications
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Articles That Have Appeared on Other Web Sites



  1. Broadcast PR: Working with Community Access TelevisionPRSA Tactics Magazine

    Public relations professionals who are involved in broadcast public relations often overlook community access television as a vehicle for their clients' messages. Although community access television does not have the centralization or unified reach of broadcast and cable television, it can still be an effective channel for community-oriented messages and causes. However, public relations professionals need to be aware of how community access television works, and the differences in dealing with community access as opposed to conventional broadcast or cable television. (This article appeared in the December 2003 issue of PRSA Tactics, page 18)
    ."...that's a great idea about CAT. Your primer is excellent."
    VP Communications, Aircraft Owner's and Pilot's Association [AOPA] - largest pilot's organization in the world




  2. Are You Sure You Are 'On Message'?

    Click here to link to the article

    How to Develop a Thematic Release Program for Channel Marketing


  3. How to Build a Sales Public Relations Program

    Vol. 1 No. 7
  4. High-Tech Entrepreneur = Pilot

    Forget the Rolex, the Lamborghini, the 100,000 square-foot 'trophy house'. Want to show everyone you've arrived? Get a pilot's license.


  5. IT Recruiting

    Spin recruiting: Develop a communications program to attract and retain IT staff


  6. MBA 101 Website
    High Tech PR Tips from GEIBEL Marketing...



  7. Assignment Two
    Back to School! - Bentley College Profession Julie Mello references our definition of public relations and links to our articles on Thematic Releases and What your Web Site Says About Your Web Savvy....



  8. How Digital Tools and Audiences Are Changing High-Tech Public Relations Simply overlaying digital tools on top of a conventional public relations program really doesn't gain you much - the unique characteristics of a 7x24 world requires a rethinking and new structure for your underlying public relations program. Here's what makes the difference:


  9. The 5W's for Direct-to-Web Public Relations Public relations materials that are going to be used on the web need to be developed with the business browser in mind. Since most material is only a mouse click from oblivion, a tight, market-centered and user-centered focus is critical for success. Here's the 5W's for your web-based public relations materials.




  10. a. The Sales Autopsy: How to Build Future Sales on Current Successes. by Jeffrey Geibel. Marketing poses problems for the entrepreneur because it... Sales Autopsy Checklist. Identify Your Last Three Successful Sales That Represent Your Sales Goals. Start by selecting the three last successful sales...

    b. Innovative Lead Generation








  11. High Tech Press Releases for the Rest of Us

    Upromote Online Magazine - Archives

    Click here to link to this article


  12. Tactics - Highlites/Hands On: Crisis Communications

    Public Relations 911. Why Crisis Planning Makes Sense. By Jeffrey Geibel, APR.


  13. Let's Make a Dealer!,

    Marketing Tools - Marketing Tools magazine

    Let's Make a Dealer! by   Jeffrey Geibel.






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